Screen-Free Week

What is Screen-Free Week?

Save the Date! May 3-9, 2021

Screen-Free Week is our annual invitation to play, explore, and rediscover the joys of life beyond ad-supported screens! 

Celebrated every spring by thousands of families, schools, and communities across the world, Screen-Free Week is an opportunity to experience what commercial-free time and space feels like. Participants pledge to replace screen-based entertainment with offline activities and downtime. It’s a chance to see that a different way of interacting with technology isn’t just possible – it’s also restorative, fun, and even life-changing! 

Screen-Free Week isn’t about what you give up. It’s about what you get! An hour once dedicated to YouTube becomes an hour spent outside; ten minutes wiled away on social media turn into ten minutes spent doodling; a video game on a rainy afternoon is transformed into hours reading, chatting, or playing pretend.

Screen-Free Week 2021 takes place from May 3-9! This year, we’re celebrating differently and inviting people from all over the globe to celebrate in ways that work for them during the pandemic. Plus, you can join us weekly for Screen-Free Saturdays! Learn more at screenfree.org/saturdays, or take the pledge for to go Screen-Free below!

Lillian, age 7

Screen-Free Week is a good time to go outside, walk in the park, and pick up trash. If we take care of the world, the world will take care of us.

2019 Screen-Free Week participant

Screen-Free Week helped to bring my family closer and challenged me to be a more intentional mom.

2013 Screen-Free Week participant

My favorite screen-free moment was when one night, my two children (ages 6 and 9) spontaneously decided to do a giant painting outside…they splattered and whacked – very Jackson Pollock-like

Emily Caldwell, first grade teacher

A lot of my students were surprised by how much they could do! Their social skills increased noticeably. I found kids interacting more with each other and saying ‘That’s a great idea,’ or ‘I did that, too!’ It’s a big change from young kids who spend a lot of time with screens and don’t know how to talk or act around one another